Beef Osso Buco

Everyone has their unattainable unicorn. Whether it’s the stunning girl that you saw on the subway or getting into Harvard, your unicorn exists. I have a few food related unicorns and this week I conquered two! Lucky for me, I can blog about both of them. (Mayonnaise post will be linked shortly!)

12 osso buco plated

My unicorn (beef osso buco)

I have a hard time photographing certain foods. Osso buco is one of them. This scrumptious, buttery meat refused to cooperate with me when I tried to photograph it. Cooking it is not a problem. As a matter of convenience, it’s become one of my go-to dishes for large crowds because it’s not a fussy dish. Yet each time I picked up a camera to photograph it, I felt like the food quickly took on human characteristics and crossed it’s arms at me and gave me dirty looks (or maybe I’m just personifying my kids personalities onto a piece of beef…).

This week, all of the pieces fell into place. The mashed potatoes were hot, the sun was shining and I’ve convinced myself that the beef was actually trying to smile at me. It was meant to be. I got a great shot!

I love this recipe for parties because it creates an incredibly flavorful dish that can be prepared ahead of time. The longer it simmers, the better it is. If you cook and cool it a day before serving it, it will be even better than you had originally anticipated! This is a meat that definitely enjoys being braised.

Enjoy!

8 portions of beef osso buco (untrussed)

8 portions of beef osso buco (untrussed)

seared piece of osso buco

seared piece of osso buco

All vegetables into the pot!

All vegetables into the pot!

add liquid and let reduce

add liquid and let reduce

more beef... it's just so pretty!

more beef… it’s just so pretty!

Optional: Use an immersion blender to puree

Optional: Use an immersion blender to puree

submerge the pieces of osso buco

submerge the pieces of osso buco

Like they're happily taking a bath...

Like they’re happily taking a bath…

Osso Buco

Osso Buco

Osso buco

Osso buco

Osso buco

Osso buco

Beef Osso Buco

Ingredients

8 shanks of osso buco (untied if you want a more rustic dish, tied if you want to plate each piece individually)
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 large carrots, coarsely chopped
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
2 cups red wine
1 28 ounce can crushed tomatoes
About 2 cups of beef stock (or water)
Kosher salt & freshly ground pepper

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, with the rack positioned in the middle of the oven.
1. In a large, flat bottomed pot, heat olive oil on medium/high heat.
2. Season each piece of osso buco with salt and pepper.
3. Add the osso buco to the pot (depending on the size of your pot, about 4 pieces will fit at a time) and sear on both sides, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer seared pieces to a plate. Sear remaining pieces.
4. Add carrots, onions and celery to the pot and saute them in the remaining olive oil and meat juices. About 3-5 minutes. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper.
5. Add wine and deglaze the bottom of the pot. Cook on medium heat until the wine reduces by half and the vegetables are softened, about 8-10 minutes.
6. Add crushed tomatoes and bring to a simmer.
7. Using an immersion blender, puree all ingredients in the pot.
8. Return osso buco to pot. Add enough beef stock to mostly cover the meat, this will be approximately 2 cups of stock. Maybe a little more, maybe a little less. Stir with a wooden spoon to mix with vegetable puree.
9. Bring pot to a simmer. Cover and put into the oven. Bake for 3 1/2 – 4 hours.
10. Remove from oven and let stand on stovetop to cool for 20 minutes.
11. Serve and enjoy!
Eat, Drink & Be Yummy!
Advertisements

14 thoughts on “Beef Osso Buco

  1. Julia Rubin

    Brasing beef is my personal unicorn — your recipe looks l ike it just may help me conquer it! Thank you for sharing Marina! Now I need an occasion to make it. WIll veal require same amount of time or does it cook faster?

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Lemon Garlic Aioli | Make-Meals Mama

      1. Annie

        I made this yesterday and it was so great! I left out the wine because I always manage to mess that part up, but I plan to try with Merlot next time. Baby Red mashed potatoes went perfectly with this. Instead of putting it in the oven I put it in the slow cooker for 6 hours and the meat fell right off the bone. Thank you for sharing. This is sure to be one I continue to make!

  3. acne cyst

    I feel a bit self-conscious writing a comment with all the other intelligent sounding comments right here, but I feel I should. I believe you are right on many of your points within this post. Thank you.

    Reply
  4. Kelsey

    Ahhhhhh we tried this tonight with 3 grass-fed beef shanks and it came out tough. I don’t know if because it’s more lean, we should have put in the oven for a lower temp for longer?? It was only in for about 50 minutes because it was a smaller amount. Any wisdom you can impart would be appreciated 🙂 I think I’d like to try it again because it was easy to put together.

    Reply
    1. makemealsmama Post author

      Osso buco is inherently a very tough cut of meat. It needs the longer braise time to break down properly. Let it braise for a minimum of 2 hours, up to 4 hours. You won’t regret it!

      Reply
  5. Baltisraul

    I lower temp to 300 degrees and cooked the 4 full hours. Fall-apart tender. Next up is using pork shanks. Pork shanks will probably not take but 3 hours at 300 degree.

    Reply
  6. Baltisraul

    If you see a sale on pork shanks give this same recipe a try with those. Even if they are not on sale pork shanks are usually cheaper. The cooking time is almost exactly the same and they are wonderful. With trial and error, I have settled on the Merlot for almost all braising. One less thing to worry about now.

    Reply
  7. Krissy D.

    As someone who grew up in a large Italian family, Osso Buco was, and still is, one of my favorite go-to recipes. Especially around Easter. 🙂 I always love seeing how others make their own versions of it, and this sounds heavenly! I never thought to puree the veggies before.
    A suggestion for those who aren’t too sure about red wine: I would try using a white wine instead. I know it sounds strange, but traditionally it’s made with white instead of red. Or, you can totally omit the alcohol all together and just add more stock or water.
    Another suggestion: Put some fresh thyme and rosemary sprigs in some cheesecloth with a bay leaf, and tie it with kitchen twine, and then put it in the sauce. It will infuse it with all those amazing flavors, and you won’t have to go digging for the sprigs and the bay leaf at the end. 🙂

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s